Archive for January, 2019

  • 5 Reasons to Get St. Bernard Puppies

    We’ve written an entire post about our St. Bernard puppies because they deserve it.

    They’re far more than the cliche image wearing a barrel of brandy around their necks. These big and beautiful pups have so much more to offer than a photo op. Take a look at five reasons we think you should consider getting one of our Saint Bernard puppies.

    Their Intelligence

    St. Bernards belong to the working dog breeds group and that’s because they’re incredibly smart and quick to learn. Guess what. All you need to give them is 15 good minutes of training each day and you’ll have one of the most intelligent dogs out there.

    Their Vast History

    The St. Bernard dog rose to fame in the late 1600s at the Great Saint Bernard Hospice. St. Bernard puppies were initially bred to pull carts and act as watchdogs. Soon they became known as snow dogs who loved to frolic and play in it and the cliche image was born.

    Their Temperament

    We’ve already talked about their intelligence, but we haven’t begun to cover their overall affable dispositions. These dogs are the creme de la creme! They are smart, sweet, eager to please, and great with kids. Because they are such family dogs, they absolutely hate being alone for long periods time. They truly thrive off of being around family and they feel oh so sad when they’re left out…so don’t!

    They’re Great Watchdogs

    As watchdogs, they will fiercely protect your home and anyone in it. Just because they’re sweet doesn’t mean they aren’t ideal home protectors. Trust us, you don’t want to challenge Saint Bernard puppies who have grown to adults.

    Their Activity Levels

    Because they were bred as outdoorsy working dogs, their activity levels reflect that. Be mindful of outside activities during the summer because their thick coats can make them extremely hot and overheat. Overall, they are rather active dogs and they will benefit from daily exercises and they will enjoy every minute of it!

     

  • Let Sleeping Dogs Lie

    As a pet owner, sometimes you just need your own space, especially when you have medium dog breeds.

    They aren’t small enough to not be intrusive, but they’re large enough to feel their presence. Do you want to get your dog a bed of his own but not sure how? We’ve got a list for that! Continue reading to learn more.

    No Floor No More

    When selecting a special bed for your pup, you should know your dog’s personality. Some dogs don’t like sleeping on the floor…they’re kinda rare but they exist! For the elite royal group, there are raised dog beds to suit them just fine. Medium dog breeds will enjoy not being on a cold floor.

    Wrapped in a Ball

    Haven’t you seen popular memes of medium dog breeds squeezing into the bed of a small dog? They’re funny and quite frankly the dogs look comfortable. Sometimes they like to be in smaller spaces. If your pup fits this category, there are bagel/doughnut-shaped beds that will help to perfect their sleeping ball position.

    Welcome Mat

    Many dogs like to stretch out so, for those pups, they’d fancy mat beds. These are big square pads that sit directly on the floor. It allows your furry baby to get comfortable and rest in any position they’d like, as long as they’re not on a cold hard floor they’re happy.

    Tent Time

    There are some dogs who really love to have their own hidden spaces. There’s a bed for that. Check out beds that are made like tents or caves. They can get in there and get their rest and sleep on with no interruptions at all!

    Cleaning Quarters

    No matter the type of bed that you choose, we highly recommend each bed has something that is removable and washable. This is important and will allow you to take off the outer layer and seamlessly pop it in the washing machine to get rid of any dirt or hair that’s been collecting over time.

  • The Nose Knows – 5 Facts About Dog’s Sense of Smell

    There’s is one thing for sure, a dog has a strong sense of smell.

    It doesn’t matter if they are hybrid puppies or purebred, all dogs possess this strong sense. So basically they can hear better than us and they have an amazing sense of smell! How much do you know about a dog’s nose? To learn more, continue reading.

    Their sense of smell is stronger than ours.

    When it comes to the sensitivity of a dog’s nose, you should know that they beat humans in this category, hands down! There’s no getting around it. Sure there are variables that contribute to what they can smell, but facts are facts. There’s a cool analogy that sheds light on just how strong they are. When you walk into a doughnut shop, you smell the sweet glaze on doughnuts or coffee scents. If one of your hybrid puppies walked into the same shop, he’d smell the ingredients of the sweet glazed doughnut. Makes sense?

    You stink…

    …to dogs that is. Even though you’ve showered and sprayed your smell goods all around you, to a dog it’s putrid! We are stinky to them, but they love us regardless, as do we to them!

    There’s no tricking a dog’s scent.

    Research has shown that a dog’s sense of smell can easily pick up on and detect anxiety, fear, and sadness. An increased heart rate and blood flow are normally accompanied by fear or anxiety. When this happens our body chemicals rise more quickly to the surface of the skin and guess what…your dog smells that! So, if you’re feeling anxious and try to brush it off with a smile around your dog, don’t think for a second that they’re buying it. They’ve already sniffed you out!

    Did you know a dog’s nose has two functions?

    This is true! One function is for smell and the other is for respiration. If you’ve got hybrid puppies or purebred ones, it’s all the same. The dog’s nose has the ability to separate air. A portion goes directly to the olfactory sensing area (for scents), and the other portion is dedicated strictly to breathing.

    They breathe in and out simultaneously.

    Dogs also have the interesting ability to breathe in and let out air at the same time! When a dog is sniffing, it creates a circulation of air, unlike with humans. We can do one other the other but not at the same time.

  • The Truth Behind How Old Is a Dog in Human Years

    For as long as you can remember, there’s always been a distinction between the age of a dog in “dog years” versus that of human years.

    Are you ready to really learn how old is a dog in human years and if that really means anything? As always, we are going to shed light on another dog topic that has people talking. Keep reading to learn more.

    The First Year

    As much as there is an easy topic that compares the age of dogs to the age of humans, we know that it’s a controversial subject. What is commonly circulated is that for every human year, there are 7 dog years in comparison. The reality is that it doesn’t matter the breed, all dogs will develop and age very similar to 15 human years in their first year of life. You read that right. In the first 5 months, your pup will lose teeth and by seven months old, they will have all of their adult teeth.

    The “Terrible Twos”

    Once again, as in the first year, the second year of your pup’s life will be the same regardless of the breed or size. They will all age pretty much at the same rate, with little variants. During the “terrible twos” your dog will age a total of 9 human years. So how old is a dog in human years? This means that after only 2 years, your dog is already past the human legal drinking age and well into their mid-20s!

    Puberty Time

    Small dog breeds grow much faster out of the puppy stage than larger dogs but they will eventually catch up to them. Large dogs reach middle age faster than small dogs.

    40 Fine

    In your dog’s fifth year of living in the big world, this is when they start a little more rapidly. Small dogs weighing 20 pounds or less are approximately 40 in human years while they are only 6 in dog years. For larger dogs, add 2 more years.

    Senior Dogs

    If you can believe it, after only 6 years of living, your dog will technically be considered a senior dog. They will continue to age anywhere from 3 to 5 years over just 1 human year.

     

Not seeing what you are looking for? Let's start by giving you a $100.00 off your puppy by making an appointment today.