Archive for July, 2019

  • What Should I know Emotional Support Dogs?

    Dogs can help relax and calm so, it’s no wonder that people suffering from anxiety and depression commonly use dogs as emotional support animals.

    Training requirements:

    There is no training required for an emotional support dog, so any dog can be an emotional support animal (ESA) without any training. The main difference between an ESA and a service dog is that a service dog is trained to ground a person with a psychiatric disorder or does work or performs task to provide services to the owner. ESA animals simply provide comfort.

    Rights and Protections:

    Since emotional support animals are not considered service animals under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), they don’t have the same rights and protections as service animals. Since ESAs have not been trained to perform a specific job, they do not qualify as service animals under the law and can be denied entry into public places including restaurants and stores. 

    Emotional support dogs provide comfort, a calming presence and company. Emotional support dogs do not have access to all public areas, but there are two legal protections. First, they can fly with a person who has an emotional or psychological disability. Second, they can qualify for no-pet housing. A letter from a physician may be requested by housing authorities and airlines because the use of emotional support dogs has been abused by some over the years.

    Characteristics to Look For:

    Your emotional support dog should be devoted to you and responsive to your emotions and commands. The dog should also be calm and laid back. A rambunctious dog has the capability of becoming an emotional support dog, but it will require more training. It is recommended to look for a dog that is around one year old so you can build that relationship with him and have him be out of his curious puppy phase. However, puppies can be emotional support animals as well; they’ll just need to be a breed that is people-oriented like Labrador retrievers, golden retrievers, Goldendoodle, and poodle.

  • How to Properly Care for Small Dogs

    Small dog breeds are wonderful and super cute animals. Taking care of small dogs can be tough at times because they are so little. You must have a special amount of patience for these dogs. So before buying one, we want to make sure you know how to properly take care of them so they can live long and healthy lives with you. We promise they will love you forever, as long as you take these precautions with them.

    1. Take them on short walks.

    Because of these dogs’ sizes, they can only handle so much exercise. It is important that you respect their size and do not drag them on long hikes that their bodies are not made. The most a small dog needs to walk around the block to get in a little exercise and handle their business.

    2. Remove all small items from the ground.

    This is beyond important when having small dogs. Dogs are curious animals, especially small dogs. They love exploring things on the ground by putting them in their mouths. To ensure their safety so that they do not choke on anything, remove all of the small toys you have in your house to higher up surfaces.

    3. Feed them the proper amount.

    Most small dogs will eat whatever you put in front of them. This is a great thing and something that should be taken with precaution. Because these dogs will eat anything sometimes they do not know when to stop. Make sure that your dog is being fed the right caloric amount every day – not too much or too little. You want your small dog to have a healthy weight to ensure that they have a happy healthy life.

    If you are thinking about or already own a small dog this summer, please make sure to take these tips seriously. We want you and your dog to have a happy and healthy life together. Small dog breeds are special animals that should always be handled with care.

  • Why Do Dogs Shed, Anyway?

    There’s no way around it, shedding stinks — whether you’re sick of encountering fur all over the house, or are allergic to dog dander, reducing shedding is a big priority for many dog owners.

    Understanding why dogs shed can help you feel better about the daily struggle with dog fur.

    Shedding is a completely normal occurrence for almost all dogs. Dogs shed for a number of reasons and regular grooming and bath times are the key to cut down on the amount of fur on your clothes and in your home.

    Dogs Shed To Grow New Fur or hair.

    Just like humans, dogs have hair that is continuously growing especially long hair dogs. Shedding is the normal turnover of hair, allowing old or damaged hair to be replaced with new healthy strands which keeps your dog’s coat in tip top condition.

    Dogs Shed When Seasons Change.

    Shedding is especially evident during the changing of seasons. The transition from a winter to summer coat is usually the time of heaviest fur loss for dogs, so don’t fret when your long haired, double-coated dog loses giant clumps of fur come springtime.

    Some Breeds Shed More Than Others.

    While all dogs shed to some degree, there is a significant difference between the amount of fur loss between breeds. Some breeds, like Poodles and Poodle-mixes, are known for shedding very little. Heavy coated breeds, like Huskies, will shed so much that you’ll be surprised that your dog has any fur left.

    Since understanding the cause of shedding won’t reduce the amount of hair your long hair dog sheds, it’s important to remember that grooming can make a world of difference. Try brushing your dog outside to reduce the amount of hair in your home. Also pet vacuums are designed to pick up dander and fur better than normal household vacuums so these can be a great option.

Not seeing what you are looking for? Let's start by giving you a $100.00 off your puppy by making an appointment today.